Liturgy – Holyart.com Blog http://192.168.99.122/com Holyblog Fri, 08 Jun 2018 15:56:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.14 http://192.168.99.122/com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2018/02/cropped-cropped-Holyart-Logo-32x32-32x32.png Liturgy – Holyart.com Blog http://192.168.99.122/com 32 32 The cassock in the Catholic Church http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/cassock-catholic-church/ Wed, 28 Mar 2018 14:35:34 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=272 Religious clothes have always been considered a sort of ‘uniform’ requested to priests to differentiate themselves from the common people. This is because since the origins of religion, there was the need to identify members of their communities even based on specific clothing. In particular, […]

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Religious clothes have always been considered a sort of ‘uniform’ requested to priests to differentiate themselves from the common people. This is because since the origins of religion, there was the need to identify members of their communities even based on specific clothing.

In particular, male religious clothes make the priest instantly recognisable and make them a reference point for the faithful. Wearing a religious clothing, be it a cassock or a clergyman, it is a way to demonstrate their function, their vocation, with all the obligations, duties and responsibilities that it entails.

The male religious piece of clothing most used by Catholic priests is the cassock, a long black robe closed by buttons and usually worn outside of religious services. The pattern and color of the details changes depending on the degree of the priest, but generally, the male religious dress is black, enriched with different coloured bands, buttons and accessories, and accompanied by different elements depending on the circumstances (eyelets, buttons, borders, liners, red ferraiolo, and pectoral cross). Higher-ranking priests wear a cape on top of their cassocks called pilgrim, and seminarians, acolytes and altar servers can wear religious clothes, but only together with the surplice. A long coat, the greek, completes the religious clothing during winter months.

Today, the clergyman has replaced in many cases the cassock as main male religious clothes. It is a complete set of pants, shorts, shirt and jacket. The shirt has a stiff collar that incorporates the cassock. The collar can be of two types: “Roman“, i.e. a white plastic strap emerging from the black collar, or a simple white plastic insert tucked into the shirt collar with two slots in which the corners are inserted. The shirt can be long or short sleeved, depending on the season. The most common colours are dark grey, light grey, blue, white, and black.

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Thuribles in liturgical function http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/thuribles-liturgical-function/ Wed, 14 Mar 2018 10:35:08 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=249 The term ‘censer‘ comes from the Latin thus, Thuris “incense.” This is also the origin of censer’s synonym is derived: it is sometimes called ‘incense‘. In Latin, it was also referred to as thymiaterium, incensorium, and fumigatorium. The thurible is a metal container, usually a […]

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The term ‘censer‘ comes from the Latin thus, Thuris “incense.” This is also the origin of censer’s synonym is derived: it is sometimes called ‘incense‘. In Latin, it was also referred to as thymiaterium, incensorium, and fumigatorium.

The thurible is a metal container, usually a vessel, equipped with a cover provided with openings. Inside the jar, on a thin layer of embers, is incense surrounded by grains. This causes the thurible to spill around a fragrant and aromatic smoke. This occurs during Catholic religious services, although the custom of burning incense or other fragrant essences always belonged to human religiosity, and similar objects to the thurible are present in many other cults and rituals.

Anciently thuribles were open, little more than boxes. They could be transported or hanged, but not shaken. Today there are fixed thuribles, also called incense burners: they are small open braziers or can be equipped with a perforated lid, but they can not be shaken. In the Ambrosian and the Eastern liturgy are still in use these thuribles.

The thuribles commonly used in Western religious services are equipped with four chains that make possible the suspension and ripple ritual with which they are shaken on the assembly of the faithful. Three of the chains are used to hold up the thurible, the fourth also serves to raise the lid and insert the incense.

The thurible is always accompanied by a further smaller vessel, the incense boat, which accommodates the incense stock. The altar boy clerk in charge of the thurible brings the latter in his right hand and the boat in his left hand, except he reverses his hands when presenting the two objects to the priest.

The thurible is used in some of the key moments of the Eucharistic celebration: the beginning, before the reading of the Gospel, during the Offertory, and at the moment of consecration.

During the funeral, the priest spreads the smoke of the thurible on the coffin containing the corpse to bless and purify it. Similarly, representations of the Virgin Mary and the saints are censered.

Censers and boats can be manufactured today with different materials, usually brass or bronze. They are often finely crafted, silver, gold, smooth, hammered, and decorated with high craftsmanship.

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Candle holder http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/candle-holder/ Wed, 07 Feb 2018 17:27:27 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=125 The candle holder is a church supply in every church and placed on the altar. It is a candle holder intended to support a single candle. Its use dates back to the very origins of the church, and is clearly linked and indissoluble to the […]

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The candle holder is a church supply in every church and placed on the altar. It is a candle holder intended to support a single candle. Its use dates back to the very origins of the church, and is clearly linked and indissoluble to the symbolism of light as an expression of Faith, Hope and Resurrection of Christ.

The candle holder was once placed on the ground, and only later on the altar before the beginning of the celebration: at the end of the Mass was being stored. In addition, alongside the candle holder, other candlesticks could be placed together in varying numbers and according to the ongoing festivities or celebration.

In the fifth century, the Statuta Ecclesiae antiquae decreed that the acolyte in the process of receiving the votes should have received in the hands a candle holder with the candle.

The Council of Trent established a precise coding for the altar service, consisting of six candlesticks to be used during Mass and seven candle holders for the Pontifical Mass of the Pope or the Bishop.

The candle holder shape derives from its original use as profane furniture, in pre-Christian times: one foot, a trunk, a plate for the wax and the tip on which to put the candle.

The candle holders, over time, have become increasingly large and with more care in the form and decoration. In addition, the materials have evolved over time, with wide use of gold, silver and other precious metals, but also of the most humble materials, such as brass or wood, depending on the possibilities of the church.

In the sixteenth century, other strict rules were coded about the candle holder: that its manufacture reminded that of the altar cross; that precious materials were reserved for official celebrations; that the style was simple, linear, with a round or triangular foot, the stem chiseled, the circular plate and the tip to the candle.

The candle holder has retained these features to date, with the inevitable artistic and formal variations related to different historical periods.

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Liturgical stoles http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/liturgical-stoles/ Wed, 24 Jan 2018 15:08:07 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=107 The liturgical stoles are a vestment worn by deacons, priests and bishops just under the chasuble. In particular, the deacons wear the liturgical stoles on the shoulders, passing on the left shoulder and tying them under the right arm; priests and bishops wear them simply […]

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The liturgical stoles are a vestment worn by deacons, priests and bishops just under the chasuble. In particular, the deacons wear the liturgical stoles on the shoulders, passing on the left shoulder and tying them under the right arm; priests and bishops wear them simply around the neck, loose on the chest.

The liturgical stole stated itself as a typical vestment of the deacon, the priest and the bishop only in the 10th century. Originally, it was called “map” or “sudarium”.

The deacon liturgical stole would come from “map” which was brought by the ancient priests on the left shoulder and worn to serve during the pagan sacrifices.

The “sudarium” was instead a cloth that speakers wore around their neck to dry and wipe away the sweat during the oratorical disputes; later, the priests began to use some sort of shroud to protect the face from the cold in winter or to wipe away the sweat.

Both these vestments, in time, would take the typical form of a strip, typical of current liturgical stoles, about 200-250 cm long and 8-10 cm wide.

The liturgical stole is usually made of silk, but it can also be packaged in another fabric.

Before the liturgical reform, liturgical stoles had a cross in the middle and at the bottom of each strip. Very ornate and rich patterns existed. Today the liturgical stoles tend to be much simpler.

The color of the stole depends on the occasion and the celebrations and follows the liturgical colors.

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Processional crosses http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/processional-crosses/ Wed, 10 Jan 2018 16:05:28 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=61 Processional crosses are mounted on long beams, which allow you to carry them in procession; are carried by an altar boy or a minor priest and usually lead the procession. In most cases, once you enter the church and reach the presbytery, processional crosses are set […]

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Processional crosses are mounted on long beams, which allow you to carry them in procession; are carried by an altar boy or a minor priest and usually lead the procession. In most cases, once you enter the church and reach the presbytery, processional crosses are set aside, but sometimes they can replace the crucifix, where it is not present.

The use of processional crosses is very old and has its origins from the importance attached by the Church from its beginnings to the diffusion of the figure of the crucified Christ, symbol of Faith and Resurrection. At first processional crosses did not have any support, or were mounted on separable beams: they were kept in the hands of those who opened the procession, and once in the church, were placed on the altar and honored with incense and bowing.

The need for them to be clearly visible from all sides, from whoever followed the procession, has meant that from the beginning the crosses were decorated front and back with the image of Christ, but also with figures of Saints or the Madonna.

The importance of processional crosses is not only liturgical but also civil, as a symbol of the church or parish that uses them. A powerful symbol, which goes beyond the confines of the building, to take the streets, to be carried out before the eyes of the people, of the faithful and not, with a value that precisely transcends purely religious meaning, to embrace a higher and deeper sense of unity and sharing, which has roots in the territory and common history.

This value has meant that particular attention was paid to the choice of materials with which the processional crosses were made, and art dedicated to their creation. The crosses must capture attention the instant they appear, like headlights of the Faith.

Discover more than 30 models of processional crosses in the catalog Holyart.com.

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The host in the Eucharistic celebration http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/host-eucharistic-celebration/ Wed, 06 Sep 2017 08:12:16 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=412 The host is the unleavened bread that symbolizes the body of Christ during the celebration of the Eucharist, the celebration which started by Jesus during the Last Supper. In fact, the host is not just a vehicle between us and Jesus, but, after the consecration it becomes […]

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The host is the unleavened bread that symbolizes the body of Christ during the celebration of the Eucharist, the celebration which started by Jesus during the Last Supper. In fact, the host is not just a vehicle between us and Jesus, but, after the consecration it becomes his body. During the Last Supper, Jesus offered his disciples bread and wine as his body and blood, inviting them to do the same in the centuries to come, to renew his sacrifice for the salvation of men. The Eucharist is therefore one of the fundamental celebrations of Catholicism, a moment when Jesus returns to become a man and to sacrifice himself for all his children once again. In Catholic and Orthodox Church the transformation of bread into the body of Christ is called ‘transubstantiation’, and in Protestant Christian Churches ‘ Consubstantiation’.

In Eucharistic celebration, the host is made of wheat, and is usually round. It takes its name from the Latin word ‘hostia’: a sacrifice to the gods. It is made with unleavened bread as required in the Exodus book. The Easter Jewish required unleavened bread and bitter herbs for dinner too, to remember the liberation from Egypt. Christian Easter, which resumes every Eucharistic celebration, marks the renewal of the new covenant through the body and blood of Christ.

Only in the Catholic Church the sacred bread becomes the Holy Eucharist and is offered to the faithful. The hosts left are kept in the tabernacle and can be regarded as Jesus himself.

Every Eucharist is a celebration of immortality and communion with Christ, who offers himself as nourishment to men and to the Church.

Thomas of Aquino wrote in the Sacramento Altaris that in every Eucharist some miracles were performed: bread is the true Body of Christ, equal to that born and to the spiritual body of the risen Christ; all the substance of bread has been transformed into Christ, therefore the bread as such no longer exists; the substance of bread is transformed into the Body of Christ, but the inconsistencies remain, the qualities of bread, which, however, does not duplicate or diminish, remains the same and intact, even when eaten by the faithful; bread as Body of Christ is present simultaneously  everywhere the Eucharist is celebrated.

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The feast of Corpus Christi http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/feast-corpus-christi/ Wed, 12 Jul 2017 14:44:41 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=369 The feast of Corpus Christi (“Body of Christ”) ends the festival that follows after Easter. It is celebrated on Thursday after the celebration of the Holy Trinity, although in many countries it falls on the following Sunday. The feast of Corpus Christi celebrates the real […]

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The feast of Corpus Christi (“Body of Christ”) ends the festival that follows after Easter. It is celebrated on Thursday after the celebration of the Holy Trinity, although in many countries it falls on the following Sunday. The feast of Corpus Christi celebrates the real presence of Christ during the Eucharist, therefore opposing the theory of Berengario di Tours, who claimed that such presence was not real but merely symbolic. This commemoration was born in the 13th century after the visions of a Belgian mystic, Giuliana of Retìne, and commemorates the origin of the mystery of the Eucharist.

In the vision of Giuliana di Retìne, the moon was full, white and shining, with a shadowy area. The mystic woman interpreted that apparition as the lack of a celebration that commemorated the Eucharist in the Church at the time for what it really was: the incarnation of Christ in the bread of the last supper. Subsequently, as to give credit to this conviction, the Eucharistic miracle of Bolsena took place: blood-drops dropped from a consecrated host and spotted the corporal worn by the priest and some of the altar’s stones. From that moment, Pope Urban IV, Giuliana’s friend and confidant, ordained that the solemnity of the Corpus Christy was official and extended to the entire church.

The corporal of the Bolsena’s miracle is still a very important element for this celebration. Every year, on Sundays after the feast of Corpus Christi, it is brought to procession along the streets of Orvieto.

The feast of Corpus Christi celebrates the relationship between the Eucharist and the Church. The Eucharist represents as the body of Christ, the Church as its mystical body, which takes origins and its deepest meaning from the former.

Everywhere the feast of Corpus Christi is celebrated with commemoration and mostly processions in which a consecrated host is exhibited to the faithful, a symbol of Jesus made of flesh and blood who sacrificed himself for us all.

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Paschal candle: the light that frees us from darkness http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/paschal-candle-light-frees-us-darkness/ Tue, 25 Apr 2017 12:54:50 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=324 The Christ-Light axiom is one of the most recurring in the Catholic religion. From the origins of the Liturgy, light from lamps and candles was used as symbol of light of the Resurrection of Jesus: a light, which can dissipate the darkness of the darkest […]

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The Christ-Light axiom is one of the most recurring in the Catholic religion. From the origins of the Liturgy, light from lamps and candles was used as symbol of light of the Resurrection of Jesus: a light, which can dissipate the darkness of the darkest night.

Firstly, God created light, and throughout the Bible, this is considered as a sign of God’s presence, and manifestation of His greatness.

But it was with Jesus that the symbolic value of light obtained its most important role.

Jesus speaks of himself as the true light, and of his disciples as the light of the world, which must “shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven. (Mt 5:16).

In particular, the great Paschal candle lit on the Easter Vigil, placed in the baptistery and brought in solemn procession, has itself a strong symbolic value.

In the darkness that characterizes the Easter Vigil, the Paschal candle is lit by the priest in order to enlighten the dark abyss where men wander, deprived of light and hope for new life. This weak flame is needed to revive the hope to the faithful ones. In the glow of the blessed candle, the faithful ones recognize themselves as the children of light, in communion with God and with their brothers. The light from these candles, and in particular the one from the Paschal candle, affects everyone present with the splendor of Christ rising from the darkness of death and defeating the evil.

The night, no longer dark but illuminated by the presence of Christ, is filled with songs of joy and hope. Every guilt is washed, every sin forgiven, in this common rebirth.

The Paschal candle should be at the center of all celebrations for the fifty days of Easter. It will be consumed, just as Jesus was “consumed” before God, by the love for men, sacrificing himself completely. His sacrifice is renewed every year by the burning of this symbol of salvation and redemption;  the smoke, going up to the sky, reminds the rise of the One who came back from the dead, to bring light and peace to men until the end of time.

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Commemorate the painful journey of Christ through the Way of the Cross http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/commemorate-painful-journey-christ-way-cross/ Thu, 30 Mar 2017 15:43:46 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=302 The Via Crucis or Way of the Cross, traces the Passion of Christ and his path towards Mount Golgotha to be crucified. Pilgrims visiting Jerusalem since ancient times celebrated this ritual: they covered the route from Pilate Palace to the mountain and to the Holy […]

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The Via Crucis or Way of the Cross, traces the Passion of Christ and his path towards Mount Golgotha to be crucified. Pilgrims visiting Jerusalem since ancient times celebrated this ritual: they covered the route from Pilate Palace to the mountain and to the Holy Sepulchre. However, it was with Francis of Assisi that the Way of the Cross knew its statement and its modern codification. In fact, not everyone could afford a trip to Jerusalem, and the representation of the Stations of the Cross became a way to make the places of the Passion accessible to every faithful.

In the first half of the seventeenth century, the first Via Crucis made their appearance in the churches and immediately had an emotional and devotional impact on believers.

The 14 paintings of the Via Crucis are arranged along the inner walls of the church in order to respect a precise symmetrical order.

The Stations of the Cross are as follows, but alternative schemes are allowed anyways:

  1. Jesus is sentenced to death
  2. Jesus takes up the cross
  3. Jesus falls for the first time
  4. Jesus meets his Mother
  5. Simon of Cyrene helps Jesus carrying the cross
  6. Saint Veronica wipes Jesus’s face
  7. Jesus falls for the second time
  8. Jesus consoles the women of Jerusalem
  9. Jesus falls for the third time
  10. Jesus is stripped of his garments
  11. Jesus is nailed to the cross
  12. Jesus dies on the cross
  13. Jesus is taken down from the cross
  14. Jesus’s body is placed in the sepulchre

The Way of the Cross is a fundamental moment for the faithful, for their experience of prayer and penance. It establishes a deep union with Christ in the moment of his supreme suffering, of his highest and more precious sacrifice.

Usually it takes place on Good Friday and is accompanied by songs and common celebrations. Since ancient times, it has also been used as a popular representation, in Italy and abroad. In this case, it becomes a real stage production, where devotion joins the spectacle, creating moments of great beauty and people’s participation.

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Using incense in liturgy http://192.168.99.122/com/church-supplies/using-incense-liturgy/ Tue, 28 Mar 2017 15:41:23 +0000 http://192.168.99.122/com/?p=299 The smell of incense has always been tied to the field of spirituality and ritual, not only in the Catholic Christian religion, but in all religions. The act of burning incense, precious material, reserved for altars of the gods and for the table of the […]

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The smell of incense has always been tied to the field of spirituality and ritual, not only in the Catholic Christian religion, but in all religions. The act of burning incense, precious material, reserved for altars of the gods and for the table of the Kings, is considered an act of devotion, a high sacrifice to the gods or emperors, who were gods’ emissaries on earth.

It is therefore a pagan act, even though there are numerous Biblical references to it; but it is that wide use of incense by worshipers of pagan gods that made it unpopular when first used by Christians, making it a form of idolatry. It was only after Constantine’s Edict that incense was again burned in braziers as a sign of devotion.

Until liturgical reform initiated by the Second Vatican Council and carried out by Pope Paul VI, the incense has held onto a marginal presence in celebrations. Incense burners were only lit during sung Mass and high Mass. After the Reformation, the use of incense was liberalised, but it actually disappeared from churches. This was the result of an incorrect translation of one of the new missal principles, which states that the use of incense during celebration is ‘ad libitum’, or ‘at will’. This statement was given a negative exception, making the act option, and therefore avoidable, or even to be avoided.

The use of incense and thurible therefore remains confined to funerals, and this does nothing but increase the false negative feeling associated with it. A real pity, because few things express sacredness like wisps of blue smoke rising up, like an intimate and sacred longing, an unquenchable and relentless desire to be reunited with God. The use of incense, even in our homes, also involves the sense of smell in a sensory experience that speaks straight to the spirit that elevates, purifies it, freeing it from all that is daily.

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